An HR exec who’s worked at Facebook and Amazon says top tech companies are no longer satisfied with candidates who can play nice with others

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Former Facebook and Amazon HR exec Bharath Jayaraman says top tech companies value people who can collaborate effectively.
That means knowing how to argue and disagree respectfully.
It’s critical that your coworker should never question your commitment to the team or the product during the conflict.

Netflix prizes employees who are “extraordinarily candid.” Amazon, those who are “vocally self-critical” and able to “disagree and commit,” i.e. forge ahead on a project even if they don’t currently support it.

Top tech companies are increasingly looking for people who, in the spirit of pushing the organization forward, know how to argue effectively. If you’re just going to nod your head and smile at every idea that comes your way, you’re probably not welcome.

Bharath Jayaraman, who has worked in human resources at Facebook and at Amazon (he’s currently the vice president of people at Paxos) said every company has its own “flavor” of collaboration. But he’s noticed that, at least at the places where he’s worked, collaboration is defined as “being able to have arguments, disagree, have difficult conversations” — respectfully.

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The key to effective collaboration — and to earning coworkers’ trust — at these companies, Jayaraman said, is to communicate that you’re committed to improving whatever product or process you’re working on. The “critical” piece, he added, is for your conversation partner to walk away saying, “I may or may not agree with you, but I don’t question your intent.”

A few years ago, I reported on research published in the Academy of Management Review, which found that the ideal form of workplace conflict is a debate about the issue at hand, as opposed to personal attacks or behind-your-back office politics. Yet …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

Miss Manners: Will nitpicking their grammar make me intolerable to co-workers?

DEAR MISS MANNERS: Sometimes at work, colleagues will ask me to review an important document they have written. They are seeking my input on the content, not the grammar.

Judith Martin

However, I often find grammatical errors. I’m no expert, but I do have a background in journalism and have been trained to find grammatical mistakes. If the error is glaring, such as accidentally omitting a word, I will point it out.

But if the error is small, or one that few people would even recognize as an mistake, I don’t mention it. After all, I don’t want to be that obnoxious, nitpicking co-worker.

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Nonetheless, I wonder if it would be better to make the corrections to help my colleagues, even though I may come off as intolerable.

GENTLE READER: “Nitpicking” has gotten a bad name. Like the word “literal,” people have grown so accustomed to using it figuratively that they have forgotten the literal meaning, which is to remove the nits — lice eggs — from someone’s hair.

A child with lice should be grateful for a nitpicking parent (and if they are not, their teachers and the other parents surely are).

Similarly, a colleague who requests the services of a copy editor should be grateful when that person identifies potentially embarrassing mistakes, large or small.

Miss Manners recognizes, without accepting, that an …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Lifestyle

      

Carolyn Hax: He’s a smug lawyer, and they hate him

DEAR CAROLYN: I have been divorced 14 years and have two adult children. Recently my children informed me they do not like the man I have been dating for several years and do not want him at family events. Why they do not like him: He is the complete opposite of their father. Also, he is an attorney, so it goes without saying that he is opinionated.

He is willing to listen and does not argue incessantly, but does offer an opinion when one is not asked. I have explained to him that if a person is not seeking his opinion, do not offer one. This is especially a problem with offering parenting opinions to my daughter and son-in-law. It drives them crazy, especially since my boyfriend has no children.

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My daughter finally became infuriated after he again told her how to parent, and they had a huge blowout. She wants nothing to do with him. His reaction was no better and he let me know he does not care for either of my children. This makes me sick to my stomach.

I love this man and we have so much fun together, seldom …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Lifestyle

      

The five emoji skin tone options don’t accommodate a diverse world

How do you choose which emoji skin tone to use? This week on Why’d You Push That Button, Vox’s Kaitlyn Tiffany and I discuss the five emoji skin tones (not counting the default gold option) and how people decide which color best represents them. The tones debuted in 2015, and now, three years later, people have studied how they’re used and how commonly people opt to change the default option. The choice isn’t as simple as you might think.

We also change the show up this week. Instead of relying on just two users, we wanted to hear about as many experiences with the emoji as possible, so we have lots of guests. Thank you to all of them for coming on the show, including Ben, J., Jordan, Joshua, Rosie, Soco, and Malachi. We also received…

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…read more

Source:: The Verge – All Posts

      

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