‘Sully’ was simply a hero, period. Why label the Southwest captain a ‘female pilot’?

By Beverly Weintraub | Special to The Washington Post

A feeling of pride swept through the small community of female pilots Wednesday as word spread that the captain who had safely landed Southwest Airlines Flight 1380 after an engine blew out in midair the day before was a woman. But disappointment tempered that sentiment. Virtually all news coverage of the incident put the word “female” before “pilot.” As a private pilot, aircraft owner and airplane racer, I shared both the pride and the disappointment.

Why not call the hero captain simply a pilot? Was Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger — to whom Capt. Tammie Jo Shults was aptly compared — referred to as a “male pilot” after landing US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River?

And why the surprise that a former Navy fighter pilot and seasoned airline captain, as Shults is, could handle an emergency situation calmly and competently?

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Part of it could be the numbers: In 1960, there were 25 female air transport pilots — licensed to fly for the airlines — in the United States; in 2016, there were 6,888, a huge increase, but still only 4.4 percent of the U.S. airline pilot population. Overall, of nearly 600,000 pilots licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration, approximately 39,000 are women. That’s around 6 percent, and that proportion has held steady for decades.

But lack of exposure goes only so far as an explanation. Women have been flying for more than a century, and flying professionally for nearly as long: first for airplane manufacturers and in airshows, then for the airlines, the military and the space program. The first licensed female pilot in the United States, Harriet Quimby, received …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Nation, World

      

Family with 13 sons welcomes Baby No. 14

Brothers Francisco, 2, Tucker, 4, Luke, 6, Charlie, 8, Gabe, 11, Wesley, 9, Calvin, 13, Drew, 20, Tommy, 16, Zach, 22, Vinny, 15, and Ty Schwandt, 25. The only brother not pictured is Brandon, 18. (Casey Sykes /The Grand Rapids Press via AP)

Brothers Francisco, 2, Tucker, 4, Luke, 6, Charlie, 8, Gabe, 11, Wesley, 9, Calvin, 13, Drew, 20, Tommy, 16, Zach, 22, Vinny, 15, and Ty Schwandt, 25. The only brother not pictured is Brandon, 18. (Casey Sykes /The Grand Rapids Press via AP) The Grand Rapids Press via AP

ROCKFORD, Mich. (AP) — There will be no shortage of hand-me-downs for this Michigan kid.

The Grand Rapids Press reports that Kateri and Jay Schwandt welcomed the birth of their 14th son on Wednesday, five days before he was due. They have no daughters.

WOOD-TV reports that the boy weighs 8 pounds, 4 ounces and is 21 inches long. His name wasn’t immediately announced.

As with their last few children, the couple from Rockford, north of Grand Rapids, didn’t want to know the baby’s sex ahead of time. Jay Schwandt said earlier this year that he would have loved to have a girl, but didn’t think would be in the cards. He was right.

Kateri Schwandt has said she’s used to large families, as one of 14 children herself.

The older brothers range in age from 2 to 25. The eldest was born when the Schwandts were students at Ferris State University.

Their names: Tyler, Zach, Drew, Brandon, Tommy, Vinnie, Calvin, Gabe, Wesley, Charlie, Luke, Tucker and Francisco.

…read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Nation, World

      

Two Florida sheriff’s deputies shot to death through restaurant window

Keith McMillan, Mark Berman | The Washington Post

Two Florida sheriff’s deputies were shot and killed while eating in a restaurant Thursday afternoon by an attacker found dead outside shortly after, police said.

Authorities said they did not immediately have a motivation for the sudden, shocking burst of violence in Gilchrist County, Florida, a small community in northern Florida about 40 miles west of Gainesville.

“I don’t have answers to why this happened,” Gilchrist County Sherifff Robert Schultz said at a news briefing.

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Schultz identified the slain officers as Sgt. Noel Ramirez, 30, a seven-year law enforcement veteran, and Deputy Taylor Lindsey, 25, a three-year law law enforcement veteran. Schultz said Ramirez had children and was married, while Lindsey was not married but had a girlfriend.

The two were “the best of the best,” Schultz said. “They’re men of integrity. They’re men of loyalty. They’re God-fearing. And they loved what they did. And we’re very proud of them.”

According to the sheriff’s office, they were eating inside the Ace China restaurant in Trenton, Florida, around 3 p.m. when “a suspect walked up to [the] business and shot both deputies through the window.”

When other deputies responded to the restaurant, they found the shooter dead outside. Schultz did not say how the attacker died, only calling the person a “coward.” The sheriff also said authorities believe this person acted alone.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating the shooting, Schultz said. A spokesperson for the department did not immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday evening.

While acknowledging that officials did not yet know a motivation for the shooting, Schultz on Thursday evening alluded to tensions that have emerged in recent years …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Nation, World

      

His victims’ families agreed to the deal — until his release date arrived

Convicted killer Nathaniel Cook, March 2018. (Dave Zapotosky/The Blade via AP, File)

Convicted killer Nathaniel Cook, March 2018. (Dave Zapotosky/The Blade via AP, File)

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — One of two brothers who carried out Toledo’s most notorious string of killings was in court Thursday, pushing to be released under a deal he made almost 20 years ago. The victims’ families, who signed off on the deal, are now opposing it.

Attorneys for Nathaniel Cook, 58, say the court is bound by the agreement to order his release this year.

The deal came about in 2000. Nathaniel and his older brother, Anthony — who was already convicted of one murder — were suspected of seven other murders committed in 1980 and 1981. Prosecutors were not sure they could prove those cases, and they wanted to give the victims’ families the assurance that the killers were in prison.

Anthony Cook made an offer: The brothers would confess to the seven murders — three of which they said Nathaniel had participated in — if the younger brother would be freed after 20 years of imprisonment. That put his release date in February 2018.

Lucas County prosecutor Julia Bates told the Toledo Blade: “It was closure, and that’s so trite, but it was closure for those people that didn’t know that maybe the person that killed their loved one was standing next to them in the grocery store.”

The families of the three victims agreed to the deal. Now they’ve written letters asking for Cook to stay in prison or be under strict controls if he’s released.

“Everyone thought 20 years was a long, long time,” Rodney Thompson, brother of murder victim Connie Sue Thompson, told the Blade.

Steve Moulton, brother of murder victim Scott Moulton, told the Blade that he thought that in the two decades enough evidence would be found to convict Nathaniel Cook of another crime to keep him …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Nation, World

      

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