The Latest: Booker to defy rule, release Kavanaugh email

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate hearings on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh (all times local):

10:47 a.m.

Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey says he’s going to make public an email from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, even if it puts him at risk of being expelled from the Senate.

Booker says he will violate a committee rule and release an email from Kavanaugh on the subject of racial profiling. The Judiciary Committee is now holding that email on a confidential basis.

Calling it an act of civil disobedience, Booker says he wants to expose that some of the emails being held back “have nothing to do with national security.”

Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas called Booker’s action “irresponsible and conduct unbecoming a senator.”

He read a rule contemplating expulsion of senators for violating Senate confidentiality rules. Several Democrats said in response, “bring it on.”

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9:55 a.m.

The Associated Press has obtained an email in which Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh disputes that the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion access is settled law.

Kavanaugh’s 2003 comments came while reviewing an op-ed in support of two judicial nominees at the George W. Bush White House.

Here’s what Kavanaugh wrote: “I am not sure that all legal scholars refer to Roe as the settled law of the land at the Supreme Court level since Court can always overrule its precedent, and three current Justices on the Court would do so.”

Kavanaugh was referring to justices at that time — meaning in 2003. The email was sent to a Republican Senate aide. The document is partially black out.

Kavanaugh has taken a different tone during his confirmation hearings, stressing how difficult it is to overturn a precedent such as Roe.

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12:30 a.m.

Senators are getting into their final round of questioning of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, and so far …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Politics

      

Letter: Emulate Sen. McCain’s desire for bipartisanship

Emulate Sen. McCain’s
desire for bipartisanship

Watching Sen. John McCain’s services on Saturday made me hope and pray that other congressional members will emulate McCain’s desire to work civilly and productively with Democrats, Republicans and independents to achieve what is best for America.

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This decent man loved his country and always wanted the best for all of us. He will be missed.

Jody Benkly
Walnut Creek

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Source:: The Mercury News – Politics

      

Letter: This one vote could help end animal cruelty

Proposition 12 a step in
ending animal cruelty

Re: “Vote yes on Prop. 12 to give farm animals a cage-free life” (Editorial, Sept. 1):

Regarding the editorial endorsing Proposition 12, it is important to realize that in today’s industrial factory farms, chickens, pigs and newborn calves are forced to live in ultra-restrictive cages that render the animal immobile.

This is incredibly cruel, but fortunately we can do something about it by passing Prop. 12 in November. A decade ago, California voters overwhelmingly passed a ballot measure that began cracking down on this abuse, and this year’s Prop. 12 will update those protections and require meat and egg companies selling in California to meet the same moderate standards.

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I believe we can all agree that cruelty is wrong, so let’s vote yes on 12!

Milena Esherick
Oakland

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…read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Politics

      

California DMV may have botched 23,000 voter registrations

By SOPHIA BOLLAG | The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO — The Department of Motor Vehicles says agency technicians may have botched about 23,000 Californians’ voter registrations under the state’s new “motor voter” law, according to a letter Wednesday from the department.

The DMV sent the secretary of state’s office incorrect information for some voters, according to the letter DMV Director Jean Shiomoto and Department of Technology Director Amy Tong sent Secretary of State Alex Padilla. The department says the errors mostly affected customers’ vote-by-mail, language and political party selections.

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The agency says it will send letters to affected voters so they can correct their information. The affected voters are scattered around the state, officials said.

The error did not allow anyone living in the country without authorization to register to vote, the Department of Motor Vehicles said.

“I am extremely disappointed and deeply frustrated that DMV’s administrative error caused inaccurate voter registration data to be transmitted to elections officials,” Padilla said in a statement. “The DMV has assured us that they have taken necessary actions to prevent this from occurring again.”

California’s motor voter law letting residents automatically register to vote took effect in April. People registered or updated their voter registration about 1.4 million times through Aug. 5, the department said.

The news comes as the DMV faces backlash for long waits at some of its offices that spurred public outcry and prompted hearings last month in the state Legislature.

Wait times improved by an average of 30 minutes statewide between July and August, the agency reported to lawmakers Wednesday.

DMV officials say they have hired more staff and brought back retired workers to speed up transactions. They blamed new technology, the new …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Politics

      

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