Word Game: Nov. 18, 2018

TODAY’S WORD — BRAGGADOCIO (BRAGGADOCIO: brag-uh-DOH-see-oh: Empty or pretentious bragging.)

Average mark 37 words

Time limit 60 minutes

Can you find 55 or more words in BRAGGADOCIO? TODAY’S WORD — BRAGGADOCIO bard bird boar board boor boric brad brag braid brig brio broad brood rabid radio ragbag raid road rood aboard abroad acid acrid agar agog airbag aria arid aroid gaga garb gird goad good grab grid grog door drab drag drib odor orca carb card cargo cigar cobra coda coir cord corgi crab crag crib

To purchase the Word Game book, visit WordGameBooks.com. Order it now for just $5 while supplies last!

RULES OF THE GAME:

1. Words must be of four or more letters.

2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed.

3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible.

4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

Contact Word Game creator Kathleen Saxe at kzsaxe@gmail.com.

…read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Entertainment

      

Bridge: Nov. 18, 2018

Tribune Content Agency

My friend the English professor, a stickler for grammar, asserts that using a double negative is a no-no. A disaster that can befall players in a team match is a “double game swing”: Their opponents score game at both tables.

In a match, one North-South played at four hearts on the auction shown, and West led a club. East won with the queen and led his singleton spade: three, queen, ace.

That defense was inadequate. South diagnosed the trump position: West had shown seven spades, had three or more clubs and hadn’t led a singleton diamond. So South let the jack of trumps ride, drew trumps and started the diamonds. Eventually, he discarded dummy’s remaining spades on high diamonds and ruffed his last spade in dummy, making four.

To beat four hearts, East had to shift to the K-A and a third diamond. West could ruff South’s jack, obliging dummy to overruff. Then, after South drew trumps, dummy would have none left, and South would lose a spade.

There was more toil and trouble at the other table. North-South bid to four hearts again, but West went to four spades and was doubled. North led the jack of hearts, winning, and then … led a second heart. West ruffed, led a diamond to dummy and returned a trump to the king and ace. He ruffed the next heart, took the queen of trumps and finessed in clubs. Making four.

To beat four spades, South could overtake North’s jack of hearts to lead his singleton club. When North took the ace of trumps, he could give South a club ruff and score a second trump trick.

East dealer

Neither side vulnerable

NORTH

S A 10 6

H J 10 8 5

D Q 7

C K 8 4 3

WEST

S K Q 9 8 7 5 4

H 4

D 9 3

C J 6 …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Entertainment

      

Horoscopes: Nov. 18, 2018

CELEBRITIES BORN ON THIS DAY: Damon Wayans Jr., 36; Chloe Sevigny, 44; Owen Wilson, 50; Oscar Nunez, 60.

Happy Birthday: A realistic view of the past will help you make wiser choices moving forward. Being honest regarding your feelings about the importance of your relationships with others will help you gain better perspective. A change will do you good, but first resolve issues that are holding you back. Your numbers are 3, 11, 20, 26, 31, 34, 42.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Emotions are welling and need to be channeled. Concentrate on something you love to do, or make plans with someone you enjoy spending time with. Talks will lead to promising plans that will give you something to look forward to. Romance is highlighted. 3 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Gather information. Check out courses and the qualifications required to do something that interests you. Set incentives and make plans that will energize and excite you to get started. Change begins within and leads to a better future. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Opportunity is apparent, but not all opportunities are equal. Don’t lean toward an offer that sounds too good to be true. Do your homework and consider the logistics of what it is you are trying to achieve. Be honest with yourself. 4 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): It’s OK to do your own thing. You don’t have to bend to what someone else wants. Moodiness will surface and cause discord if you don’t follow your heart and do as you please. Offer others the same prerogative. 2 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Short trips, physical activities and spending time with like-minded people should round out your day, but before you get started, make sure you are fully aware of the cost involved. Hidden expenses will set …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Entertainment

      

Lynne Truss’ 6 favorite seaside stories

Lynne Truss’ newest novel, A Shot in the Dark, is a murder mystery set in 1957 in an English seaside resort town. Below, the British journalist, TV presenter, and author of the international best-seller Eats, Shoots & Leaves names six favorite seaside tales.

My Policeman by Bethan Roberts (2012).

The sea, the sea! In how many books does the transition from safe dry land to bobbing about in salt water take the reader’s breath away? Set in Brighton, England, in the 1950s, My Policeman is an exquisite examination of a love triangle, and contains the most memorable encounter with the chilly English Channel I’ve ever read. I can still feel the shock and slap of those waves on my body.

The Great Western Beach by Emma Smith (2008).

This wonderful memoir is a miracle in many senses, written when the author was in her 80s. Her childhood in the 1920s was by no means idyllic, but her town’s windy beach and its seaside activities kept the parents from quarreling, which was all that mattered.

Death in Venice by Thomas Mann (1912).

It is not always a good idea to get into the water. Sometimes it’s better just to watch others … or is it? Mann investigates, in a tale of unconsummated desire sparked by an encounter on a beach on Venice’s Lido.

Jaws by Peter Benchley (1974).

Sometimes, as I said, better just not to go in.

‘At the Bay’ by Katherine Mansfield (1922; published in The Garden Party and Other Stories).

I had read a lot of Katherine Mansfield before I even started on Virginia Woolf, and I’ve always preferred Mansfield. This long story, set near her native Wellington, New Zealand, is wonderfully atmospheric …read more

Source:: The Week – Entertainment

      

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