Don’t bet on the Golden State Warriors

If you want easy money, don’t bet on the Golden State Warriors. ESPN reported Friday that final scores in Warriors games this season are an average of 10.5 points off of their predicted point spread — a nightmare for bettors.

In point-spread betting, gamblers bet on the difference, aka “spread,” of a game’s final score. And while the defending NBA champions win most of their games, their quality of play fluctuates drastically from night to night, which means the scoreboard’s final tallies are extremely unpredictable. Professional bettor Erin Rynning summed up the issue to ESPN: “It’s a headache. You do all this research and you want to think you’re going to get 100 percent effort … [but they] are bored. They have bigger fish to fry.”

In order to minimize fatigue in the long 82-game regular season — not to mention conserve energy for an expected lengthy postseason run — the Warriors generally rest one or two key players per game under the guise of a minor “injury.” These rests rarely lead to actual losses for the Dubs, but the absence of a star player like point guard Stephen Curry can lead to reduced margins of victory that mess with the spread. The Warriors are also notorious for playing possum in the first half of games and then either racing to huge leads in the second half or squeaking out victories in a game’s final minutes.

While the Warriors’ ability to “flip the switch” makes for great TV, it doesn’t make for good predictions. In a season where the Warriors’ actual win-loss record is 23-6, their record against the point spread is only 14-15. Read more at ESPN.

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Source:: The Week – Lifestyle

Australia has an unusual recommendation to prevent child sex abuse

In an effort to protect children from sexual abuse, Australia has put forth an interesting proposal: Catholic priests should no longer be forced into involuntary celibacy.

BBC reported that the Australian Royal Commission on Institutional Responses to Child Sex Abuse, a public inquiry panel convened to examine how children are exploited and abused within society frameworks like churches and schools, published that recommendation Friday as part of its final report after a five-year study. The panel claimed involuntary celibacy could contribute to “psychosexual immaturity” in Catholic clergy, which could in turn put children at risk.

Although the commission is careful not to claim that Church-sanctioned virility is the ultimate solution to ending child sex abuse, the report does note that celibacy “contributed to the occurrence of child sexual abuse, especially when combined with other risk factors.” The commission also recommended mandatory reporting of abuse by those who work as early childhood workers, registered psychologists, and religious ministers.

The commission received over 40,000 phone calls and 1,300 written accounts of child sexual abuse from the public, as well as reviewed more than 8,000 cases since 2013. The commission found schoolteachers and religious ministers were the most common perpetrators of child sex abuse, and that Catholic priests accounted for over 60 percent of reported abusers in the religious community.

The president of the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference, Archbishop Denis Hart, said in statement that child abuse was part of “a shameful past, in which a prevailing culture of secrecy and self-protection led to unnecessary suffering for many victims and their families.”

Read the full report on the Royal Commission’s findings at BBC.

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Source:: The Week – Lifestyle

This Virginia state lawmaker is on a quest to legalize public profanity

Cursing in public has been banned in the state of Virginia since before the Civil War. Even today, public profanity in Old Dominion is a misdemeanor that can cost you $250.

If you think that’s some bullshirt, you’re not alone, The Washington Post reports: Virginia House Delegate Michael Webert (R) wants to overturn this unusual law in the name of free speech. But Webert’s plan could face some opposition in the state legislature, the Post explains, because “legislators who vote for repeal could stand accused of promoting profanity.”

The profanity ban was actually ruled unconstitutional decades ago, but Webert has already failed to overturn it twice. Del. David Albo (R), a Webert ally in the battle over cursing, said the quest is difficult because people won’t look at the issue in context. He compared profanity to flag burning — bans on which have been ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court but still exist in Virginia state law — predicting that some politicians would use the issue to smear their opponents. “They’re not going to explain the whole thing. For most people it’s not worth it,” Albo told the Post.

Claire Guthrie Gastañaga, the executive director for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Virginia affiliate, explained to the Post that although public cursing is only a misdemeanor, police “often” use it as an excuse to detain a subject, conduct a search, and then “arrest the person on another charge.”

Webert has a more old-school way to punish foul-mouthed Virginians. “When I cursed, my mother told me not to and handed me a bar of soap,” he said. “You shouldn’t get hit with a Class 4 misdemeanor.”

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Source:: The Week – Lifestyle

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