FEMA reports data breach impacting 2.5 million survivors

By Joel Achenbach, William Wan and Tony Romm | Washington Post

WASHINGTON – The Federal Emergency Management Agency shared personal addresses and banking information of more than 2 million U.S. disaster survivors in what the agency acknowledged Friday was a “major privacy incident.”

The data breach, discovered recently and the subject of a report by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General, occurred when the agency shared sensitive, personally identifiable information of disaster survivors who used FEMA’S Transitional Sheltering Assistance program, according to officials at Federal Emergency Management Agency.

In a statement, FEMA Press Secretary Lizzie Litzow said the breach happened because “FEMA provided more information than was necessary” while transferring disaster survivor information to a contractor.

“We believe this oversharing has impacted approximately 2.5 million disaster survivors,” said a Department of Homeland Security official who asked for anonymity in order to provide background information beyond the official FEMA statement.

He said 1.8 million people had both their banking information and addresses revealed, and about 725,000 people had just their addresses shared.

The U.S. government mishandled personal information from victims of some of the country’s worst disasters – including hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria in 2017– in a major privacy mishap that threatens survivors with “identity theft and fraud,” according to the watchdog report. That report, dated March 15, estimated that 2.3 million people had been affected, slightly less than the estimate from the DHS official on Friday.

The security mishap involved a program managed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency that places people affected by disasters in temporary housing. The agency shared “unnecessary” amounts of data — including home addresses and birth dates and in some cases more sensitive information about their bank accounts — according to findings of the Office of the Inspector General.

It is unclear if the data breach had led to …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Business

      

Us will only be the 8th original movie to top the box office in the past 2 years

Jordan Peele’s Us is about to tear up the box office — and accomplish a feat that has become depressingly rare.

The latest film from the director of Get Out is set to be one of the few movies not based on anything to top the box office since 2017, observes IndieWire’s David Ehrlich. As he points out, the only films in the past two years that were original stories and beat the competition were Get Out, Dunkirk, Coco, The Hitman’s Bodyguard, Happy Death Day, and Night School.

original movies (not sequels, spin-offs, adaptations, or remakes) that have won a box office weekend since 2017:

– GET OUT
– DUNKIRK
– COCO
– THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD
– HAPPY DEATH DAY
– A QUIET PLACE
– NIGHT SCHOOL
– US

— david ehrlich (@davidehrlich) March 22, 2019

In that time, just about everything else has been a sequel, a reboot, or a film set in a cinematic universe, plus movies based on real people (although technically, Dunkirk is also based on a real event, so Us would be seventh if this were included). Thus far in 2019, the films that have debuted at number one include three films based on a comic book or manga, three sequels, and one remake.

At the moment, Us is projected to make about $64 million over the weekend, per The Hollywood Reporter, which would make it the biggest opening ever for an original R-rated horror film. Clearly, the horror genre has played a major role in keeping audacious, original movies alive at the box office, making up half of Ehrlich’s list — with two being helmed by Peele himself. Screenwriter C. Robert Cargill observed on Friday that horror is “the last genre you can make $100 million in while discussing smartly the problems that plague both …read more

Source:: The Week – Business

      

Indonesian carrier cancels order for 49 Boeing 737 Max 8s

By Stanley Widianto and Timothy McLaughlin | Washington Post

JAKARTA, Indonesia – Indonesia’s national airline Garuda Indonesia is moving to cancel an order for 49 Boeing 737 Max 8 jets following the deadly crashes involving two of the aircraft, a spokesman for the company said Friday.

The decision comes less than two weeks after an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed en route to Nairobi from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people onboard. A flight of Lion Air, a low-cost Indonesian airline, crashed in October shortly after takeoff from Jakarta, killing all 189 passengers and crew.

Both crashes involved the 737 Max 8 model and have brought intense scrutiny to U.S.-based Boeing, which marketed the 737 Max 8 as a fuel-efficient jet of the future, as well as to the Federal Aviation Administration. Garuda Indonesia’s cancellation is believed to be the first scrapping of an order for the plane in reaction to the crashes.

Ikhsan Rosan, a spokesman for Garuda Indonesia, told The Washington Post the decision to cancel the order was due to “consumers’ low confidence” in the airplanes following the crashes. The order was first announced in October 2014.

Rosan said airline officials told Boeing of the decision by letter and were scheduled to meet with representatives from Boeing to discuss the matter on March 28. A spokesman for Boeing said the company does not comment on discussions with customers.

“The discussion won’t be easy,” he said. Garuda Indonesia ordered 50 of the aircraft, Rosan said, and one has been delivered but was grounded after the Ethiopian Airlines crash earlier this month. Garuda Indonesia has a fleet size of 144 aircraft, according to the company’s website. An additional 58 aircraft are operated by its low-cost carrier, Citilink.

Authorities investigating the crash of Lion Air flight 610 say erroneous sensor data triggered an automated anti-stall feature, known as …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Business

      

Boom! Bay Area job surge is led by South Bay, San Francisco, East Bay

The Bay Area job market powered to sturdy increases in February, fueled by employment surges in the South Bay, East Bay and the San Francisco-San Mateo region, state labor officials reported on Friday.

Santa Clara County added 3,000 jobs, the San Francisco-San Mateo metro area gained 3,700 jobs and the East Bay added 1,400 positions during February, according to seasonally adjusted figures from the state Employment Development Department. Santa Cruz County gained 600 jobs.

The Bay Area added 7,000 jobs in February, the EDD reported.

California added 14,600 jobs, which means the Bay Area accounted for 48 percent — nearly half — of all the jobs created in the Golden State last month. All the numbers were adjusted for seasonal variations. The statewide jobless rate remained steady at 4.2 percent in February.

…read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Business

      

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