Proposed Trump administration rules could throw 3.7 million people off food stamps, new study says


Food bank

The proposed Trump administration changes to the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) could strip 3.7 million low-income Americans of their food stamps and slash benefits for millions of others, according to a new study released last week by the Urban Institute.
The analysis said that had the rules been implemented last year, the number of people receiving benefits would have fallen by 3.7 million people in an average month, or around 9.4%.
It would also cut the benefits paid under the program by $4.2 billion.
According to the study, 12 states and the District of Columbia would be particularly hard-hit as the average number of households benefiting from the program would drop by at least 15 percent
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The Trump administration’s proposed changes to the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) could strip 3.7 million low-income Americans of their food stamps and slash benefits for millions of others, according to a new study released last week by the Urban Institute.

The analysis said that had the rules been implemented last year, the number of people receiving benefits would have fallen by 3.7 million people in an average month, or around 9.4%. That would also cut the benefits paid under the program by $4.2 billion.

Nearly 40 million people currently receive food stamps, according to the Department of Agriculture.

According to the study, 12 states and the District of Columbia would be particularly hard-hit as the average number of households benefitting from the program would drop by at least 15 percent. They included California, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Washington and Wisconsin.

Nevada and the District of Columbia, though, would undergo the highest reductions— 22% and 24%, respectively. The study also estimated 2.2 million households would lose eligibility and the monthly $127 in average benefits it brings.

“Households without children, older members, or members with …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

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