Utah firefighter’s death caused by retardant drop from low-flying 747


SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The official report on last month’s death of a Draper firefighter battling a California wildfire reveals that thousands of gallons of flame-retardant were dropped on him from a Boeing 747 mistakenly flying only 100 feet above the treetops.

The pilot and a supervisor flying ahead in a small guide plane led the giant modified jetliner nearly into the trees on Aug. 13 because the pilots failed to recognize that there was a hill in the flight path, according to the Green Sheet report by the state’s firefighting agency.

Because of the near ground-level release, the retardant struck with such force it uprooted an 87-foot tree that fell on Matthew Burchett, a 42-year-old battalion chief for Draper who was helping with the Mendocino Complex Fire north of San Francisco.

Another large tree was snapped by the force of nearly 20,000 gallons of liquid and three firefighters were injured, one seriously.

The guide pilot “made a ‘show me’ run” for the 747 pilot over the intended path for the retardant drop, and marked the path for the jet with a smoke trail, according to the report.

“Obscured by heavy vegetation and unknown to the (747) pilot, a rise in elevation occurred along the flight path.” The ground sloped up about 170 feet so quickly that the 747 cleared the hilltop in just two seconds, according to the report.

The guide planes have two people aboard, a pilot and an “air tactical supervisor.” California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection spokesman Mike Mohler could not immediately say if either would face investigation or discipline for not identifying the hill.

The retardant drops were intended to help secure a fire break cut through the trees by a bulldozer to stop advancing flames. Burchett and the other three firefighters were working on the hill next to the firebreak when …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Top stories

      

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