Chancellor Philip Hammond had no evidence for his statement that disabled workers hurt the UK economy, the government quietly admits


philip hammond red briefcase

There was no evidence to support Chancellor Philip Hammond’s statement to the Treasury Select Committee that employing workers with disabilities lowers national productivity, the Treasury has admitted.
Hammond had made people angry last month when he said: “far higher levels of participation by marginal groups and very high levels of engagement in the workforce, for example of disabled people — something we should be extremely proud of — may have had an impact on overall productivity measurements.”
He doesn’t actually believe that, and the data don’t support it, the Treasury said in response to an FOI request last week.

LONDON — Chancellor Philip Hammond had no evidence to back his statement that disabled workers lowered British productivity, the government has quietly admitted.

Hammond made the statement to the Treasury Select Committee in December, during a discussion about why productivity rates had fallen in the UK, and the effect of that decline on British GDP.

Last week, the Treasury admitted there is no evidence to suggest that employing workers with disabilities lowers national productivity.

“There is no evidence of a relationship between aggregate productivity measures and an increase in workforce participation of people with disabilities. It has however helped to increase economic growth and it is something we can be very proud of as a country,” the Treasury said in a response to a Freedom of Information request by Steve O’Hear, a writer for Techcrunch.

At the committee hearing, Hammond had been asked why UK productivity was near zero in 2017. He replied:

“It is almost certainly the case that by increasing participation in the workforce, including far higher levels of participation by marginal groups and very high levels of engagement in the workforce, for example of disabled people – something we should be extremely proud of – may have had an impact on overall productivity measurements.”

He was …read more

Source:: Business Insider

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