Inside the battle between an anti-Putin banker and the firm that produced the Trump-Russia dossier


FILE PHOTO: Hermitage Capital CEO William Browder waits to testify before a continuation of Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., July 27, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

A fierce, but muted, battle erupted last year between banker-turned-human-rights activist Bill Browder and the opposition research firm Fusion GPS.
Fusion is the organization that produced the explosive, unverified dossier that detailed President Donald Trump’s alleged ties to, and escapades in, Russia.
That battle escalated on Tuesday when the ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, unilaterally released the transcript of an interview the committee conducted with Fusion’s cofounder, Glenn Simpson.

A fierce, but muted, battle erupted last year between banker-turned-human-rights activist Bill Browder and the opposition research firm Fusion GPS, which produced the explosive, unverified dossier that detailed President Donald Trump’s alleged ties to, and escapades in, Russia.

That battle escalated on Tuesday when the ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, unilaterally released the transcript of an interview the committee conducted last August with Fusion’s cofounder, Glenn Simpson.

In the interview, Simpson said his work for the American law firm BakerHostetler — which was representing the Russian holding company, Prevezon, accused by the US government of laundering money into New York City real-estate — was focused “on trying to get William Browder to testify under oath about his role in this case and his activities in Russia.”

Browder, according to Simpson, had told the Justice Department that the laundered money was stolen from Russia as part of the tax-fraud scheme that his lawyer, Sergei Magnitsky, had uncovered in 2008.

Magnitsky was arrested and imprisoned that year, and Browder’s reputation has become inextricably linked to the global human-rights campaign he launched after Magnitsky died in prison in 2009. Browder and other independent human-rights organizations have said that Magnitsky was beaten to death after he discovered a $230 million tax-fraud scheme that implicated high-level Kremlin officials.

Simpson told lawmakers …read more

Source:: Business Insider

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